We are experiencing a very bad weather patterns across the country and in Maine as well. There is no catch of lobster around the coast of Maine that cause a huge spike in lobster price. While we still honor all the orders that has placed, we made some price increases on our live lobster products to keep up with the cost rises. We hope for your understanding and hopefully price will come down soon when there is more catch.

What's The Diffrence Between King Crab VS Snow Crab?

Crab can be considered as one of the best seafood kinds, since it helps to keep you strong and healthy. Among different types of crab, King crab and Snow crab are the two most popular ones nowadays. Are they similar in appearance and size? Do they taste the same, or which one is better? Together with Fisherman's Net, let’s figure them out in today’s article - “King Crab vs Snow Crab: What are the differences?”.

King Crab vs Snow Crab

1. King Crab vs Snow Crab: Are they different in Size? 

When you look at these two crabs, size will be the core element which helps you to distinguish between them. As stated in its name, “King” Crab is obviously a big creature, and it is clearly bigger than Snow Crab. So far, the largest King Crab that fishermen have ever found reaches 20 lbs (320 oz) and 5 ft long. 

A fisherman with a huge King Crab

In addition, when compared to King Crab, the legs of Snow Crab are normally longer and slimmer. Specifically, their legs can reach between 2 to 4 lbs (32 - 64 oz). 

The long legs of Snow Crab

In general, King Crab is usually measured 6 lbs (96 oz), while Snow Crab is often weighed from 2 to 4 lbs (32 - 64 oz). Since King Crab is bigger in total size, their legs are bigger and thicker than those of Snow Crab. Also, King Crab has fatter legs than those of Snow Crab, and has many large spines on them.

The big and thick legs of King Crab

Here is another tip that helps you to distinguish between the two types of crab. The number of legs a crab has can tell you which kind of crab it is. Particularly, King Crab has 3 pairs of legs and 2 big claws, while Snow Crab has 4 pairs of legs and 2 claws. 

2. King Crab vs Snow Crab: Where and When to find them?

Let’s get to know where each kind of crab comes from first! Snow Crab prefers the deep, cold water conditions; so they live in the North of the Atlantic and Pacific oceans. In specific, they usually reside around Maine, Alaska, Canada, Norway, Russia and even Greenland. 

Snow Crab

Meanwhile, King Crab has less habitat compared to the Snow type. This kind of crab also loves frigid water, so they are typically found around Alaska and the Bering Sea. The red and blue King Crab live nearer to mainland Alaska, while the golden one often stays along the Aleutian Islands in the Bering Sea. 

King Crab

Now you know where these two crab types live, the question is: When can we find them? Snow Crab’s harvesting season begins in April and lasts until late October or early November. In contrast, King Crab season is much shorter which normally kicks off in late October and ends in early January. 

3. King Crab vs Snow Crab: Are they unlike in Texture and Flavour?

3.1 Texture

Meat consistency

The name “Snow” Crab is invented due to its meat texture. When being cooked, Snow Crab meat turns from red to snowy white. Furthermore, the texture of this crab type is firm and tends to be more fibrous, which makes it easier to shred into small pieces like corned beef. 

Snow Crab Meat

Different from that, King Crab meat tends to come off in big, firm hunks. 

Crackability

Most of the time, Snow Crab can be cracked easily by just using the hands due to its thin shell. 

Snow Crab shell can be cracked easily by hands

Meanwhile, King Crab are typically covered in spikes and are much more rigid, which is why eating this type of crab requires tools like crab crackers.

King Crab shell is typically covered in spikes, and is much harder than Snow Crab

3.2 Flavour

Then, when it comes to the flavour “battle” of King Crab vs Snow Crab, which is the better one? It is actually hard to find out the answer for this question, since each type has its own advantages. In other words, whether it is King Crab or Snow Crab depends primarily on your tasting preference. 

In general, they do have differences in flavour. Snow Crab has a sweet, slightly briny taste. 

Snow Crab is sweet and slightly briny

On the contrary, King Crab is truly a meal made for kings. It has a sweet, mild flavour, and is often compared to lobster. 

King Crab has a lobster-like flavour

4. King Crab vs Snow Crab: Are they divergent in Price?

As we have stated in the second section, King Crab has a short harvesting season, which leads to limited availability. Additionally, it has lobster-like flavour. Thus, King Crab is the more expensive among the two types. Particularly, Snow Crab legs are typically more affordable than King Crab ones. 

5. Conclusion

To sum up all the differences between King Crab and Snow Crab, please have a look at this table below. 

King Crab

Snow Crab

Size

6 lbs (96 oz)

2 - 4 lbs (32 - 64 oz)

Legs

Bigger, thicker, shorter

Slimmer, longer

Location

Around Alaska and the Bering Sea

In the North of the Atlantic and Pacific oceans

Season

From late October to early January

From April to late October or early November

Meet consistency

Comes off in big, firm hunks


Color: From red to snowy white when cooked

Texture: Firm and more fibrous
Therefore, easily shred into small pieces

Crackability

Can be cracked easily by hands

Can only be cracked with specialized tools (Eg. Crab cracker)

Flavour

Sweet, mild (Similar somehow to lobster)

Sweet, slightly briny

Price

More expensive

More affordable

That is all for today’s topic: King Crab vs Snow Crab! Fishermen’s Net hopes that you are now able to distinguish between the two crab types with these four differences above.

Visit our blog for more useful tips related to lobster. Feel free to contact us via the below contact information if you have any further questions or requests. 

  • Website: www.mualobster.com
  • Address: 849 Forest Ave, Portland, ME 04103.
  • Tel: +1 (207) 772-3565.